DIY BOOKCLOTH BUNTING

Bunting is a simple and easy way to dress up any style of party. While bunting is a traditional staple that people expect to see, I guarantee you nothing says "party"  and instantly livens up the joint more than a great garland. Changing the materials and even the shapes ever so slightly can add a small detail to the party that really makes it pop. Traditional doesn't have to be boring.

I can only hope that if you have been reading this blog for a while, you know how to make bunting. At the same time, many of you are just starting out on the party train and well, I am going to teach you. So let's get started.

You will need:

5 1/2" wide bookcloth tape

twine

scissors

rotary cutter, straight edge and cutting mat (optional, but oh so good)

I found this pretty sherbet pink bookcloth tape on clearance. I got ten feet for $6. When making bunting, keep your eyes peeled for interesting papers, fabrics, or bookcloth. Buy colors that you love and tend to use a lot. It will come in handy later down the line even if you don't use it for it's intended purpose. The bookcloth tape is a long strip of bookcloth, the beautiful thick woven texture of a fabric bookcover, with super doublestick tape attached to the back. I love ready-to-stick items...they just scream "make me into a garland!"

 

You could cut these by hand with scissors, but you'd have to be really careful. The wonderful thing about rotary cutting tools is that you can cut really straight lines and be consistant. I swear by my rotary cutter. Now keep in mind, use a separate one for papers and fabric. When you cut fabric, you need super sharp and paper dulls blades quicker than all get out. Remember this for scissors, too. Now that I am done filling you head with random acts of information, let's cut a piece of bookcloth tape 9" long.

Fold this piece in half and cut into two pieces. I cut in half at the 2 1/2" mark, making a 2 1/2" flag and a 3" flag. Another great thing about bunting is that there is no right answer or way of doing things. Learn the basics and do your magic.

Set out a length of twine and center a flag underneath it. Peel back the paper backing and press the twine into the fold line. Fold over the top to the bottom of the flag, lining up the edges and press flat. Repeat with remaining flags, alternating or mixing up the sizes to your desire.

Cut each flag into either a bunting shape or a triangle flag. I alternated with both, using the flag shape for the smaller size. It adds a little more visual interest.

Behind the scenes: I thought I would show you how I cheat when I photograph garland. I find it looks best when pulled away from the wall. You can use broomsticks or like this example, tie the other end to the blinds. On my christmas list is a backdrop stand, but I just might have to make one. This is the first of many beginner DIYs to come. What would you like to see?